Liberty County Estate Inventory & Division – William Norman

These antebellum estate inventories and appraisals generally included all the deceased person’s “property,” including enslaved persons. Only those names are documented here for historical and genealogical purposes. Anyone interested in the actual property owned by the deceased may find it at the link at the bottom of the page. Names are listed in the original order, as this often gives very valuable information about family groupings or the age of children (who may be listed in age order).

Location: Liberty County, Georgia
Deceased: William Norman
Date Sworn: 1843-08-24
Appraisers: Thomas Quarterman, J. Wilson Winn, Jno. [John] S. Norman
Estate Guardian: Alexander M. Sanford, guardian of the estate’s minors
Court Officer: T.W. Quarterman, J.P.
Date Recorded: 1844-01-10
Recording Official: J.S. Bradwell, C.C.O.
Total Value of Property Appraised: $7352.12
Value of enslaved persons: $6675.00
Comments: Lot #2 was drawn by William S. Norman, who signed the following document on August 26, 1843: “Georgia, Liberty County } Received of Alexander M. Sanford, guardian for the minors of the late William Norman deceased of the state and county aforesaid (myself being one of the said minors) my full proportion of property of all kinds land excepted, and I do by these promise to discharge one half of the debts against the aforenamed estate of Norman, and furthermore I do acquit and release the said A.M. Sanford from any longer being guardian of my portion of property.” Witnesses were John P. Hines and G.W. Dunham, J.J.C.L.C, and it was recorded on January 11, 1844, by J.S. Bradwell, C.C.O. [NOTE: Presumably Lot #1 was continued to be held for another minor.]

Enslaved Person Named Value Desc. Lot #
Dembo 500 driver 1
Nat 400 1
Nanny 350 1
Mingo 175 1
Cretia 100 1
Julia Ann 75 1
Diannah 300 1
Amy 100 1
Frank 50 1
Hetty 300 1
Louisa 275 1
Dinah 250 1
Matilda 275 1
Dembo 25 Old 1
Sary 125 1
Cudjoe 400 2
Sambo 250 2
Cephas 350 2
Philis 300 2
Cinda 300 2
Sylvia 275 2
Billy 100 2
Bristol 100 2
Victoria 50 2
Sue 350 2
Joe 200 2
John 100 2
George 50 2
Sylvia 200 Old 2
Celia 350 2

Find the digitized original at: “Georgia Probate Records, 1742-1990,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QS7-893L-GHJL?cc=1999178&wc=9SYT-PT5%3A267679901%2C268032901 : 20 May 2014), Liberty > Wills, appraisements and bonds 1790-1850 vol B > image 617 of 689

6 thoughts on “Liberty County Estate Inventory & Division – William Norman”

  1. In these inventories, one can see that it was the ownership of said “slaves” that actually made planters wealthy. The math shows the value of slaves was far more valuable than their actual real estate/land…in which the free labor of a continuous flow of African slaves was needed to clear virgin lands (trees, swamps, flora and fauna, masses of earth for rice cultivation and cotton). Slaves were the main cog in the gears that kept the system going.  When the Civil War rolled around, this is what the South was trying to hold onto SLAVERY in order to maintain their economic and social status in the world…China, Europe, and the United States were customers purchasing southern exports.

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  2. Yes, that’s why I’m noting the “value” of the slaves vs. the entire value of the estate! (Though normally the estate inventories don’t include land.) It’s becoming so obvious that I actually wish I had kept it separately in a spreadsheet so I could calculate the average, but in almost every case it’s over 80% of the value.  Stacy

    From: Hermina Glass-Hill To: They Had Names ; Stacy Cole Cc: Rose Mullice Sent: Sunday, October 7, 2018 7:54 PM Subject: Re: [New post] Liberty County Estate Inventory & Division – William Norman In these inventories, one can see that it was the ownership of said “slaves” that actually made planters wealthy. The math shows the value of slaves was far more valuable than their actual real estate/land…in which the free labor of a continuous flow of African slaves was needed to clear virgin lands (trees, swamps, flora and fauna, masses of earth for rice cultivation and cotton). Slaves were the main cog in the gears that kept the system going.  When the Civil War rolled around, this is what the South was trying to hold onto SLAVERY in order to maintain their economic and social status in the world…China, Europe, and the United States were customers purchasing southern exports.

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  3. Slave Names | NCpedia

    | | | | Slave Names | NCpedia

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    and The Story of Cudjo Lewis — The Last Living Slave Brought To America

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    | | | | The Story of Cudjo Lewis — The Last Living Slave Brought To America

    As a slave, he went by the name “Cudjo,” a day-name given to boys born on a Monday, as the slavers could not pro… |

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  4. Pg. 256 of the print book, “Why Dealt With Them Thus?”

    From: Hermina Glass-Hill To: Stacy Cole ; They Had Names Cc: Rose Mullice Sent: Monday, October 8, 2018 9:32 AM Subject: Re: [New post] Liberty County Estate Inventory & Division – William Norman Right! I’ll have to read that chapter. 

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